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Baillon collection under the hammer: this junk will bring millions!

Artcurial
Baillon collection under the hammer
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I n the context of the classic car fair Retromobile, the auction house Artcurial is auctioning 59 vehicles from legendary collection. The vehicles were bought by Roger Baillon and his son Jacques in the 50s to 70s and parked in halls. The Delahaye, Bugatti, Delage, Maserati and Co. have spent decades safely behind closed doors. The years have gnawed heavily at the substance of the automobiles.

Actually, it would be desirable for the collection to go completely into one hand and later be shown in a museum, because the vehicles tell their own, exciting story - and each one is its own little work of art. But on February 6, 2015 the last part of the Baillon collection will also be torn apart.

Estimates of 200 to 12 million euros

For just a few hundred euros there is a chance of buying one of the cars, lot 1 is a Singer 1500 with an estimate of 200 to 800 euros. Many offers are in the range of up to 5,000 euros, two lots stand out with their estimates: On the one hand, a Maserati A6G 2000 Gran Sport Berlinetta with a Frua body (lot 58), the estimated price of which is stated at 800,000 to 1.2 million euros. The other is the Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider, which was once driven by film star Alain Delon. This of course increases the value: the estimate is between 9.5 and 12 million euros.

The classic car scene is eagerly awaiting the event, because among the 59 cars there are numerous rarities, which are also heavily gnawed for top prices are good. Lot 15, for example, is a Facel Excellence from 1960 that has been part of the collection since 1964. 52,213 km are on the clock of this rare luxury sedan.

With an estimate of 400,000 to 600,000 euros, a Talbot-Lago T26 Gran Sport is going into the auction race. The car with a traceable history is in poor condition, but with the right restorer it could rise from its ruins and become a concours winner. There are several of this caliber among the 59 vehicles. There is already a lot of speculation in advance as to which of the classics will be marveled at in Pebble Beach, Amelia Island or the Villa d'Este in the next few years.

We show all lots in our photo show.

The classic car collection from Roger and Jacques Baillon

The entrepreneur Roger Baillon made after the Second World Warbig money fast. First he bought trucks of the US Army and the Wehrmacht, converted them for civilian purposes and rented them out. After all, he develops his own forward control truck, builds a factory with around 200 employees and manufactures his trucks. In the 1960s, he founded a forwarding company and ensured further demand and well-filled accounts with new developments such as a tank trailer.

Roger Baillon and his son Jacques are pursuing the dream of having their own car museum. For little money he buys all the luxury cars that nobody wanted back then - like the Schlumpf brothers. He collects more than 200 vehicles - Bugatti, Delage, Ferrari, Maserati, Hispano-Suiza, Delahaye or Lagonda. But the situation also changed for Roger Baillon when his company got into severe turbulence in the 1970s.

Two auctions in 1979 and 1985

The end of dreams finally came in 1978, when Baillons Spedition went bankrupt and the automobile enthusiast became the focus of tax investigations. Then things move very quickly: the first 60 automobiles from his collection are auctioned off in June 1979. Almost 1.3 million francs come together - at that time around 560,000 marks. In 1985, another 32 vehicles went under the hammer, fetching around 2.6 million francs (then around 853,000 marks).

Nothing happened for 30 years - at least the public didn't notice. However, after the death of Jacques Baillon at the end of 2013, the heirs decide to auction the rest of the collection as well. 59 vehicles will go under the hammer on February 6, 2015 in Paris as part of the Retromobile classic car fair.

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