• Home
  • sports-car
  • First drive in the Porsche 918 Spyder: Walter Röhrl shows the future

First drive in the Porsche 918 Spyder: Walter Röhrl shows the future

Manufacturer
First drive in the Porsche 918 Spyder
Subscriptions & booklets

D did he actually still do that to himself at his age must: move a hybrid, command two electric motors. But for Walter Röhrl (65), the type of automobile movement does not matter. It has to be quick. It all depends on the overall result. The former rally world champion is happy to serve the cause.

And finally there is also a lot to do: a carbon fiber monocoque made according to the latest findings. The backbone cast in RTM technology; Doors, hoods and the roof are laminated. Together an extremely rigid structure to accommodate a high-revving V8 engine behind the two seats (which will also be used in the next GT3 generation) - and it is derived from the 3.6 liter racing engine of the LMP2 racing car RS Spyder - say some.

Legitimate successor to the Porsche Carrera GT

The others - especially Dr. Frank-Steffen Waliser, says: “Apart from the bank angle and the number of cylinders, the engines have nothing in common.” Welsh should know exactly. He is the responsible developer behind the project Porsche 918 Spyder, the legitimate successor to the legendary Porsche Carrera GT (here in the Supertest) , which should mark the top of the sports car world in almost exactly one year with a dose of 918 units.

Porsche 918 Spyder with 795 PS system output

Then with a targeted NEDC consumption of a meager three liters per 100 kilometers and a maximum output of 795 PS - system strength. Two electric motors, with a power of 85 kilowatts at the front and 95 kilowatts at the rear, flank the 580 hp V8 and make the Porsche 918 Spyder becomes an all-wheel drive vehicle that, with its 6.8 kW /h lithium-ion battery, also weighs 1,700 kilos.

Röhrl turns the ignition key and the dial for a total of five possible driving modes on the steering wheel to the E-Power position. The development carrier of the Porsche 918 of it. A few stones patter in the wheelhouses as the Spyder, whose two roof halves will later find space under the front hood, stalks away through Nürburg - looking for the undulating, winding country roads of the Eifel.

High-tech athlete in race mode

Röhrl considers the time to be ripe and lures the other self out of the high-tech Porsche 918 Spyder. He clicks the rotary switch on 'Race-Hybrid'. The V8 reports for service, rattling and rattling. In terms of sound, it is not yet up to par. From a technical point of view, however, he is already smoothly involved in the sophisticated drive train with seven-speed dual clutch transmission - apart from this one dramatic, seemingly never-ending blow to the back.

Under full load, the two electric motors boost and the upset 9,000 Touring storming V8s so brutally that the 1700 kilograms, which are slightly rear-heavy at 43 to 57 percent, suddenly dissolve into nothing. Even at this early stage of its development, the Porsche 918 Spyder consistently ironed out asphalt warpage. The systems are really sensational ”, praises Röhrl and - at least from the front passenger seat, extremely motivated - is heading for a serious right-left combination. But driver and vehicle swallow the radii as quickly and naturally as a hearty Bavarian his Oktoberfest beer. The all-wheel steering is effective.

The lane scurries away just 17 centimeters below the top of the range when Röhrl launches a new praise: 'It brakes more than I've ever experienced.' However, it is more impressive than the pure braking performance itself the technology behind it. Because a large part of the braking power takes place via recuperation. The transition between the frictional power on the ceramic discs and the recuperation power of the electric motors is absolutely imperceptible to the occupants.

Porsche 918 raises the bar

But the fact that the Porsche 918 Spyder will raise the bar for supercars to a new, unprecedented level. Ferrari and McLaren will follow with similar technologies. The challenge at the highest level is on - and that in turn is exactly the thing that Walter Röhrl loves to do to himself.

0 Comments

Leave a reply

Name *